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Adult Education and Training 

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Good paying jobs give people the opportunity to support themselves and their families while creating economic stability and growth throughout the region. Programs that train and educate workers are a critical investment, particularly for skilled workers and the aging workforce.

 

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LEARN
tactics for giving to promote adult education and training
  • Support programs at community and technical colleges that prepare working students for careers in high-demand fields
  • Support nonprofits that provide support services to low-income adults pursuing post-secondary education
  • Support organizations that broker partnerships between industry and educational institutions to make training programs more accessible and affordable
The Seattle Foundation evaluated organization
In 2007, nearly half of all income in King County went to the top 20% of households while less than one-twentieth went to the bottom 20%.
Stay Informed:

Jump$tart Washington
Jump$tart Washington is a nonprofit coalition created to promote the need for financial education in Washington state.
Low-Skill Workers' Access to Quality Green Jobs
This brief discusses strategies for improving access to green jobs among those with low skill levels, particularly jobs that can help improve workers’ economic standing and better support their families.
A Summary of the King County Community Conversation Opportunities for Youth and Young Adults
This report summarizes the results of the King County community conversation held on February 29, 2012, to garner community input about the needs, challenges and opportunities for youth ages 16-24 in King County who are neither in school nor employed.
Charting a Path
Linking low-income, low-skilled adults to education and training leads to family-supporting jobs.
The Economic Contribution of Seattle Community Colleges
A recent economic impact study shows that the Seattle Community Colleges play a major role in the region's economy, creating a total impact in King County of $1.1 billion a year.
Want to know more about this issue or how to make an impact?
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