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Education 

Education: Girl Taking Notes 

Providing every child with a high-quality education is among our most important responsibilities as a community. Educational attainment is perhaps the most powerful factor in determining whether children will reach their full potential as healthy, self-sufficient adults.

 

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LEARN
ABOUT THESE STRATEGIES:
Involve families and communities in ensuring student success
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Teach lifeskills for success in life, college and career
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Increase support for high-quality public schools
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GIVE
TO SUCCESSFUL ORGANIZATIONS:
Denise Louie Education Center »Denise Louie Education Center (DLEC) provides educational services to over 200 at-risk children and families through the form of prevention, early intervention, and family and community partnerships.
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Treehouse »Even the best foster parents are hard-pressed to meet the needs of a child suffering from abuse or neglect, and the state covers only 60% of the cost of basic care. Treehouse fills the gaps for kids in foster care.
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Seattle Education Access »SEAs doors are open to all at-risk, low-income young adults in King County, Washington who have a strong desire and the necessary life skills to go to college, but who have inadequate resources to make their dreams a reality.
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The Seattle Foundation evaluated organization
Success Story
Basic Computer Classes Help Low-income Parents Manage Their Children's Education
New Futures provides a broad range of services for children and families in four low-income apartment complexes in South King County. Ninety percent of the families served by New Futures don’t have computers at home, and even more of them are recent immigrants or refugees who struggle with language barriers. For these parents, getting involved in their children’s education is a daunting notion. To encourage the use of computers as a tool for managing their children’s education—for emailing teachers, learning about school events and even monitoring grades and attendance—New Futures offers basic computer classes for parents. The organization also brings school representatives in to meet with parents and provides family advocates who accompany parents to school meetings and help them contact teachers as needed.
20% of K-12 students in King County’s Roadmap Region (SE/SW Seattle, South King County) switched schools within the last year.
Stay Informed:

Teaching Adolescents to Become Learners
This report by the Consortium on Chicago School Research outlines a new framework for understanding how non-cognitive factors influence the behaviors that drive academic performance among middle and high school students.
With Their Whole Lives Ahead of Them: Myths and Realities About Why So Many Students Fail to Finish College
Based on a national survey of young adults, this research dispels some common myths about why so many students do not graduate and details what kinds of changes might make a difference.
The Road Map Project 2013 Results Report
The Road Map Project's Results Report is the Road Map Project’s annual report card. It presents the most recent data on the project’s Indicators of Student Success and, where possible, shows trends and results relative to baselines and targets.
Trends in Education Philanthropy
Grantmakers for Education (GFE) introduced its annual Benchmarking survey in 2008 to gauge the state of education philanthropy and to learn from its members how the field was evolving. Every year since 2008, they have offered a snapshot of trends, emerging issues and challenges funders saw on the horizon. The latest report in this series was published in 2012.
A Revolution Begins in Teacher Prep
A new generation of teacher education programs is challenging how teachers get trained for the classroom.

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